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Brazil off the beaten track.

Brazil off the beaten track.

I have spend the past 10 days cycling through Brazil without meeting a single non brazilian. And I have been cycling through some truly amazing landscapes and stayed at some fantastic beaches. But foreign tourists in Brazil almost all stick to a few famous spots, so Brazil is probably the easiest place in South America to get totally off the beaten track when you are tour cycling.

Cycling along the brazilian coastline.

Cycling along the brazilian coastline.

Espirito Santo is one of the most forgotten states in Brazil as it is squeezed in between the two big stated Rio de Janeiro and Bahia. But that does not mean that Espirito Santo is not interesting. It has some amazing beaches, with hardly any tourists and it’s one of the places that makes sure that Brazil is one of the biggest farming nations on the planet, having field after field with pineapples, sugar cane and various other agricultural products. I have truly enjoyed cycling up through the state, partly along the coast and partly through farm regions. The capital Vitoria is not really a city that is my cup of tea, but maybe I just had a bad day when cycling through. But the rest of the state has been nothing but pure joy to cycle through.

Fishing boats on the brazilian coastline.

Fishing boats on the brazilian coastline.

Brazilian family on a sunday bicycle trip.

Brazilian family on a sunday bicycle trip.

Before coming in to Espirito Santo, I was cycling through the northern part of the Rio de Janeiro state. That part of Brazil is mainly known for having offshore oil fields. So it does not attract many tourists, but I can only recommend people to go there. The area has fantastic beaches, pleasant little towns and I found decent accommodation everywhere I went.

Brazilian children fishing.

Brazilian children fishing.

Talking about accommodation: I have had some very good prices in Espirito Santo. I have typically paid between 10$ and 25$ per dight and mostly had very nice rooms with private bathroom, air con and such. I am, in fact, sitting writing this blogpost from a 3 star hotel, that I am paying 20$ to spend the night in and that includes breakfast.

The entrance to the local cemetery in Sao Mateus.

The entrance to the local cemetery in Sao Mateus.

Typical road scene in rural Brazil.

Typical road scene in rural Brazil.

I have been cycling through a couple of nature reserves too, where signs have been asking to please not run over boa snakes, capybara’s, panthers and other exotic animals. The animals I have seen the most though are the vultures who are always sitting by the side of the road giving me hungry looks.

A sign telling me not to run over the Boa snakes.

A sign telling me not to run over the Boa snakes.

Pineapple fields in Espirito Santo.

Pineapple fields forever.

So if you think that there is no pretty places left in this world that is not flooded by the international tourist crowd, then just head to the state of Epirito Santo in Brazil and you will see that there is still pristine places left in this world, for those of us who are ready to go off the neaten track.   

Cycling the brazilian highways is great.

Cycling the brazilian highways is great.

 

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1 Comment

  1. Brazil has quite a few off the beaten path destinations worth checking out. Not sure if you are heading towards the Central West part of Brazil, but Bonito is also another great “hidden gem” of Brazil. The main attraction there is Rio da Prata, which is a crystal clear river that you can snorkel and see some tropical fish. It’s actually one of the largest fresh water rivers in the world perfect for snorkelling as the river bed is only a couple of Meters below you. It’s relatively unknown to foreign tourists, but quite a popular weekend getaway for Brazilians.

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